Trademarks 101

Trademarks come in three flavors: state, federal, and international. A trademark is legal protection for the continuous use of a mark (slogan, logo, etc) in commerce within a particular industry or business. The most common trademarks (which also have the best protection) are federal trademarks, granted upon application and negotiation with the U.S. Patent & Trademark Office. An often overlooked trademark (which is less expensive and provides more local protection) is a state trademark – granted in both Kansas and Missouri. And treaties and other legal systems protect trademark rights internationally too. When your business or nonprofit’s distinctiveness and reputation depends on using a mark, slogan, logo, or other insignia, you need a trademark. And you need an experienced trademark attorney who understands the application and negotiation process and has a proven track record of helping clients get trademark protection.

My law firmJohnson Law KC LLC, is experienced counseling individual, corporate, and nonprofit clients on entertainment law, copyright, trademark, and IP litigation issues. We work with authors, musicians, artists, photographers, bloggers, songwriters, filmmakers, and others to provide cutting edge, reliable expertise on IP. We can help you answer these questions with confidence and friendly expertise. If we can serve you with your entertainment law, copyright, or IP questions, please call (913-707-9220) or email (steve@johnsonlawkc.com) to schedule a free, convenient consultation.

(c) 2016, Stephen M. Johnson, Esq.

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